Libyan ceasefire deal reached, deserted in a number of hours

By REUTERS
July 29, 2017 10:15
1 minute read.
Breaking news

Breaking news. (photo credit: JPOST STAFF)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Standing beside French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris this week, Khalifa Haftar, the most powerful military leader in eastern Libya, was smiling when he shook on a deal with the country's prime minister for a ceasefire and Spring elections.

But hours later and away from the diplomatic stage, Haftar exposed the reality of deep fractures in Libya's political landscape, saying any ceasefire was limited, he actually had no interest in elections and Prime Minister Fayez al-Serraj's power-sharing council was in the grip of terrorists.

Keen to expand the French role in ending Libya's crisis, Macron had applauded the moment as a powerful act for peace among the country's rival armed factions who have skirmished over the oil-producing desert state since the fall of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.

Getting the rivals together for only the second time may have been an achievement. But Haftar's subsequent remarks were a reality check on the complexities of uniting Libya's fractious players and delivering on the ground after years of failed Western efforts to end the crisis.

Related Content

Breaking news
July 17, 2018
Report: Terror balloon lands in kindergarten, no casualties reported

By JPOST.COM STAFF