Rice: Iran cannot avoid inspections of suspicious sites

By REUTERS
July 16, 2015 05:01
1 minute read.

 
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WASHINGTON - Iran will have no way to avoid inspections of military or other sites that the United States and its allies deem suspicious when a nuclear pact sealed this week goes into effect, US National Security Adviser Susan Rice said on Wednesday.

Rice, in an interview with Reuters, said the deal would not give Iran any room to oppose inspections if Washington or others had information believed to reveal a secret site that they took to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for review.

"If the Iranians said, 'No, you can't see that site,' whether it's a military site or not, the IAEA, if it deems the site suspicious, can ask for access to it," she said.

If Iran refuses access but five of the eight international signatories to the deal demand an investigation under a newly created joint commission, Iran must comply, she said.

"It's not a request. It's a requirement," Rice said. Iran would be "bound to grant that access."

WASHINGTON - Iran will have no way to avoid inspections of military or other sites that the United States and its allies deem suspicious when a nuclear pact sealed this week goes into effect, US National Security Adviser Susan Rice said on Wednesday.

Rice, in an interview with Reuters, said the deal would not give Iran any room to oppose inspections if Washington or others had information believed to reveal a secret site that they took to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for review.

"If the Iranians said, 'No, you can't see that site,' whether it's a military site or not, the IAEA, if it deems the site suspicious, can ask for access to it," she said.

If Iran refuses access but five of the eight international signatories to the deal demand an investigation under a newly created joint commission, Iran must comply, she said.

"It's not a request. It's a requirement," Rice said. Iran would be "bound to grant that access."

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