Tel Aviv to commemorate LGBT victims of the Nazi Regime

By JPOST.COM STAFF
January 6, 2014 12:58
1 minute read.

 
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The Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality will inaugurate a monument to commemorate members of the LGBT community who were persecuted by the Nazi regime for their sexual orientation and gender identity on January 10.

The new monument will be mounted outside the Municipal LGBT Community Center in Meir Park (Gan Meir) which serves as the city's main hub of activity for the LGBT community.

The monument will feature short texts in Hebrew, English and German. It will be shaped in the form of a pink triangle, reminiscent of the pink triangles LGBT community members were required to attach to their clothes in the concentration camps.

Homosexuality was a felony under the Third Reich. The Gestapo founded an anti- homosexual unit that consisted of nearly 100,000 people who were alleged members of the LGBT community. An estimated 15,000 of those were sent to concentration camps. In Buchenwald experiments were carried out with the intention of supposedly curing people from homosexuality.

In statement, Tel Aviv mayor Ron Huldai said, "This monument reminds us all how important it is for us to respect every human being. It is only natural that such a reminder will exist in Tel Aviv-Yafo – a city that warmly embraces all groups and minorities."

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