Thousands march in Indiana to protest law seen targeting gays

By REUTERS
March 29, 2015 07:04
1 minute read.

 
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INDIANAPOLIS - Thousands of people marched in Indiana's largest city on Saturday to protest a state law that supporters contend promotes religious freedom but detractors see as a covert move to support discrimination against gay people.

Waving signs reading "No hate in our state" and carrying rainbow flags, a crowd of at least 2,000 people including Democratic elected officials rallied the same day that business-rating website Angie's List Inc put on hold its plans to expand its Indianapolis operation with new offices, citing the new law.

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act was passed overwhelmingly by the Republican led-state legislature and signed into law on Thursday by Indiana Governor Mike Pence.

Supporters say the legislation will keep the government from forcing business owners to act against strongly held religious beliefs. Opponents say it is discriminatory against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people and broader than other states' religious freedom laws.

"This bill is not about discrimination and does not in any way legalize discrimination in Indiana," said Pence's spokeswoman, Kara Brooks.

That statement did little to assuage the concerns of Rick Sutton, one of the marchers.

"It's a great sound bite but it's not the truth. I'm not protected. LGBT citizens are not protected," Sutton said. "If we were protected, we would not be there right now."

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