Woman killed in Washington car chase had post-partum depression, family says

By REUTERS
October 5, 2013 04:40
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

STAMFORD, Conn./WASHINGTON - The woman who engaged police in a dramatic car chase through the streets of Washington, prompting a lockdown of the US Capitol before officers shot her dead, suffered from post-partum depression, her sisters told CNN on Friday, while questioning why she had to die.

Miriam Carey, 34, had her one-year-old baby in the car with her on Thursday when she tried to drive her black Infiniti coupe through a barrier near the White House, then sped away toward Capitol Hill, leading police on a high-speed chase that ended when her car got stuck on a median and police shot her.

Investigators probing the incident are focusing on whether Carey had mental problems that triggered her actions, said a US official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Carey was diagnosed with post-partum depression a few months after the birth of her baby, her sister, Amy Carey-Jones, told CNN host Anderson Cooper on Friday evening.

"My sister did experience post-partum depression, with psychosis, they labeled it," Carey-Jones said, echoing comments reported earlier by ABC News which quoted Carey's mother as saying her daughter had post-partum depression and had been hospitalized as a result.

Carey-Jones, who said she spoke often to her sister, disputed reports suggesting that her sister might have suffered from schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

Related Content

Breaking news
August 14, 2018
Moscow regrets that U.S. is suspending Open Skies treaty

By REUTERS