Economy ministry issues tender for NIS 10m high-tech minority integration program

Arabs often have greater difficulties finding employment in the high-tech sector than their Jewish counter-parts.

By
October 5, 2014 19:29
1 minute read.
Ramat Gan general view

Ramat Gan general view. (photo credit: RAMAT GAN MUNICIPALITY)

The Economy Ministry on Sunday issued a tender for a NIS 10 million program to help integrate 1,000 Arab, Druse and Circassian college graduates into the hi-tech sector over three years.

“The most significant challenge facing Israeli hi-tech today is the shortage of skilled manpower required for the technological professions, and this is what we are working to solve,” Economy Minister Naftali Bennett said. “Talented individuals from the Arab sector have incredible potential that has not yet been realized, and they can be absorbed and integrated through the program.”

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The group that wins the tender will be responsible for running a program to provide students and academics from the target communities with professional guidance and training to help them find placement in the hi-tech community.

Arabs often have greater difficulties finding employment in the hi-tech sector than their Jewish counterparts. A large proportion of Arab Israelis who study hi-tech at the best schools end up employed in other fields.

“There are skilled and highly qualified professionals – hundreds of male and female academics from the Arab, Druse, and Circassian sectors – available for work in the hi-tech and medium-hi-tech industries. This program comes to create the significant link between supply and demand,” the Economy Ministry’s Director of Employment Regulation Michal Tzuk said.

The International Monetary Fund and the Bank of Israel have both said that integrating Arabs and ultra-Orthodox Jews into the labor force is a top priority for Israel if it wishes to maintain a strong economy.


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