Track & Field: Sprint legend Carl Lewis inspires Israeli audience

American who won nine Olympic gold medals and eight World Championship golds has been hired by Bezeq as a motivational speaker.

By JEREMY LAST
September 15, 2009 06:54
1 minute read.
Track & Field: Sprint legend Carl Lewis inspires Israeli audience

carl lewis 88. (photo credit: )

 
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Former 100 meters world record holder Carl Lewis used his wealth of competitive experience to try and inspire a group of Israeli workers when he addressed the Bezeq Expo in Tel Aviv on Monday. The 48-year-old American, who won nine Olympic gold medals and eight World Championship golds in a career spanning 18 years, had been hired by Bezeq as a motivational speaker. "People are always focused on being number one in the world. I never wanted to be number one. I wanted to be the best all the time," the ex-athlete remembered. "Before every race I would shake every athlete's hand. I would say to the other athletes good luck with my hand and you've lost with my eyes. One of Lewis's most prominant victories came in the 1988 Olympic 100m final when he came in second but was awarded the gold after winner Ben Johnson tested positive for steroids. Another standout performance was in the 1991 World Championships final when he reclaimed the world record with a time of 9.86s. During Monday's talk Lewis attempted to explain what it feels like to run the fastest any human has ever run. "The best way to describe it is that the faster you run the easier you feel. The 100m is the ultimate dichotomy," he said. "You have to be explosive, powerful and strong and at the same time be relaxed and smooth."

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