President’s Succot open-house to focus on environment

Once a year, the residence of the president of Israel can be visited by Israelis, tourists without an appointment or an official invitation.

By
October 5, 2011 23:41
1 minute read.
Beit Hanassi (Ariel Jerozolimski).

Beit Hanassi 311. (photo credit: Ariel Jerozolimski)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Once a year, the residence of the president of Israel can be visited by Israelis and tourists alike without the need for an appointment or an official invitation.

It has been a long-held tradition for the presidents of Israel to open the residence to the wider public during one of the intermediate days of the Succot festival.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


In previous years, the residence was open both in the morning and the afternoon to accommodate the huge crowds, but during the tenure of President Shimon Peres, the time frame has been reduced to the morning only, while the volume of exhibits and the number of activities has been increased.

This year, the president will open the residence on Monday, October 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. The focus of the day will be the quality of the environment.

Exhibits inside the residence and in the grounds will highlight Israel’s achievements in the fields of agriculture, science, technology and welfare. A photo exhibit will show the president with some of the international dignitaries he has received at the residence.

There will also be a variety of activities for both parents and children.

Visitors who have only read about alternative energy, or have heard about it on radio or television, will be able to see for themselves what it’s all about. They will also get a glimpse of Israel’s latest agricultural developments, and in the realm of science, will be able to view the 10-meter-high Shavit satellite launcher.



Dancers, singers and musicians will be performing throughout the morning to keep visitors entertained.

For security reasons, anyone planning to attend should make sure in advance that they are carrying an ID card or passport. Visitors are also asked to refrain from carrying weapons, large bags or parcels. It is advisable to arrive early as queues are usually long and the security process can be very time consuming.

Entrance to the compound is through the main gate.

Related Content

Holland Park’s forest, north of Eilat.
August 11, 2014
Promising trend of prosecution for environmental crimes, officials say

By SHARON UDASIN