New 'seek and destroy' method to fight cancer

TAU researchers are strengthening odds in favor of permanent tumor destruction and an immunity to cancer’s return.

By NATASSIA GERRARD/ NO CAMELS
January 2, 2012 10:18
3 minute read.
Brain tumor

Brain tumor 311. (photo credit: courtesy Mayo Foundation)

 
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Natassia Gerrard writes for NoCamels.

Even when surgical tumor removal is combined with a heavy dose of chemotherapy or radiation, there’s no guarantee that the cancer will not return. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University are strengthening the odds in favor of permanent tumor destruction — and an immunity to the cancer’s return — with a new method of tumor removal.

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Based on “tumor ablation,” a process through which the tumor is destroyed inside the body, Prof. Yona Keisari of TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Prof. Itzhak Kelson of TAU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy have developed a radioactive wire, less than an inch long and about the width of a pin. When inserted into a solid tumor, the wire releases lethal radioactive atoms that irradiate the tumor from the inside out. In turn, the tumor creates antigens, which “trigger an immune response against the cancerous cells,” Keisari tells NoCamels.

“Surgery can eliminate 80 to 90 percent of a tumor”, adds Keisari. “Chemotherapy another 5-15 percent and still there are often a small number of metastatic cells left in the body, and they kill about 85 percent of the patients.”

Currently, cancer patients receive gamma radiation when they undergo radiation therapy. Although alpha particles are much more effective, their range is so short that they’re unable to penetrate the skin, and therefore ineffective in traditional radiation treatments. As developed in Prof. Kelson’s lab, the radioactive wire circumvents the drawbacks of alpha radiation by implanting radioactive ions directly into the tumor.

“The wire is coated in atoms that emit not just alpha particles, but also daughter atoms which are themselves alpha emitters. These particles diffuse inside the tumor, spreading further and further before disintegrating,” says Kelson.

As it breaks down, the tumor releases antigens which trigger an immune response against the cancerous cells, Prof. Keisari explains. Not only are cancerous cells more reliably destroyed, but in the majority of cases the body develops immunity against the return of the tumor, which does not happen when tumors are removed surgically.



‘Cluster Bomb’

He calls the procedure “a cluster bomb” — instead of detonating at one point, the atoms continuously disperse and emit alpha particles at increasing distances. The process takes approximately ten days, leaving only non-radioactive and non-toxic amounts of lead. The wire itself, which is initially inserted into the tumor by hypodermic needle, decays harmlessly in the body, the researchers say.

In pre-clinical trials on mouse models, this method showed a distinct advantage over surgical tumor removal. One group of the mice was treated with surgical tumor removal, while another group underwent ablation treatment using the radioactive wire. When cells from the tumor were re-injected into the subject, 100 percent of those treated surgically redeveloped their tumor, compared to only 50 percent of those treated with the radioactive wire.

The researchers showed positive results with different types of cancers, including lung, pancreatic, colon, breast, and brain tumors. “At the moment the treatment will be limited to tumors with a diameter of less than 5 cm,” Keisari tells NoCamels.

DαRTTM has been commercialized by medical group Althera Medical LTD, located in Bnei-Brak, Israel and New York City and clinical trials at Bellinson Hospital in central Israel will soon start.

According to Prof. Keisari, this is just the beginning of an emerging field of cancer treatment. He hopes to see researchers from all over the world come together to create a comprehensive view of the advances in tumor ablation and the stimulation of anti-tumor immunity.

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