Soldier who was in contact with rabid puppy on Golan Heights being sought

The Health Ministry is looking for a soldier who brought a rabid puppy to a veterinary clinic in Katzrin on the Golan Heights.

By
September 9, 2013 18:00
1 minute read.
A BOY gives his dog water from the Ein Lavan spring near Jerusalem.

Boy and dog 370. (photo credit: REUTERS)

The Health Ministry is looking for a soldier who brought a rabid puppy to a veterinary clinic in Katzrin on the Golan Heights.

The ministry said that on Sunday evening, rabies tests for the small, black dog were received as being positive for the fatal viral disease. The puppy had been bitten by an unidentified animal and infected.

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A handful of other people who were in direct contact with the puppy have been identified and given prophylactic treatment. Epidemiologists are checking whether others, too, touched the dog.

The ministry reported on Tuesday another case of a rabid dog – a large, lightbrown German shepherd that was taken in by a family in Moshav Sha’al on the Golan.

The family members were identified and are getting treatment.

The ministry noted that anyone who has been in direct contact with a wandering mammal between August 20 and September 6 should contact the Safed district health office at (04) 699- 4218/699-4257 or go to the nearest district health office.

After work hours, go to a hospital emergency room.



The ministry also is trying to send this information to tourists who visited the Golan Heights in recent weeks.

Children in the relevant area should be queried by parents if they were in touch with suspicious animals. Pet owners should check to make sure their animals’ vaccinations are updated.

If bitten or scratched by a mammal, wash the wound immediately with running water and soap, disinfect it and go to a district health office, where experts will decide if vaccination is needed.


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