Egged, mon amour

Elad Malka has opened a Facebook page titled Egged Watch, where he invites residents to detail specific cases of bus service problems in the city.

By
January 12, 2017 16:48
3 minute read.
Egged bus

Egged bus. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)

 
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The electronic signboard at the No. 7 bus stop on Bethlehem Road indicated that the next bus was due to arrive in 24 minutes. Two old ladies waiting for the bus sat there, covered to the eyes in a vain attempt to shield themselves from the cold wind. Another person waiting asked them if there was a mistake regarding the frequency of the line, and was answered by one of the women in a bitter tone: “These signs are lying!”

This happens regularly almost everywhere across the city – electronic signboards providing false information of all sorts about bus arrivals. Sometimes, to complete the picture, the signs just shut down, leaving puzzled passengers a laconic announcement: “Temporary failure.” Too often “temporary” seems to serve as a synonym (or euphemism) for “permanent.”

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