Walking the ramparts of history

From sultry Mossad stories to classic battles of King Herod, there are several possible walking routes along the Old City walls.

By
December 5, 2013 13:17
The ramparts atop the Old City walls.

Ramparts atop the Old City walls jerusalem 521. (photo credit: SHMUEL BAR-AM)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

In 1967, Israel began preparing for what became the Six Day War. At the time, Jerusalem was a divided city, and the country’s leaders realized that they lacked information about Jordanian positions on the ramparts atop the Old City walls. But how to lure the soldiers out of hiding so the army could see where they were stationed? Officers came up with a creative solution: They arranged for a shapely Israeli girl to stand on a balcony in the Mamilla neighborhood, across from the Old City walls, and slowly and provocatively to remove her clothing. As Jordanian soldiers exposed themselves in a rush to get a good view, Israeli forces were able to photograph their positions.

Assuming that this was but one of a multitude of Israeli legends, a guide told the story during a tour he was leading at a battle site from the Six Day War. To his astonishment, a woman on the tour declared that every word of the tale was true. She should know, she said, because she was the girl whose job it had been to lure the soldiers out of hiding! Soldiers are no longer stationed on the ramparts patrolling the walls. Today, tourists and Jerusalemites stroll atop those walls for a firsthand view of both old and new Jerusalem.

Read More...

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content