Legacy of Maimonides

The Israel Museum’s new exhibition brings the Rambam to life through rare manuscripts and his own signature.

By ARIEL DOMINIQUE HENDELMAN
January 23, 2019 18:47
Legacy of Maimonides

. (photo credit: JERUSALEM INSTITUTE FOR POLICY RESEARCH)

 
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Most of us have heard the name Maimonides. One does not necessarily have to be a Torah scholar or even have spent time in yeshiva to know of the medieval Sephardic philosopher who was one of the most influential rabbis and Jewish writers ever.

Rabbi Moses ben Maimon – aka the Rambam, aka Maimonides – lived in the 12th century in present-day Spain, Morocco, and Egypt. In addition to being a philosopher, astronomer, scientist and physician, he authored some of our most important Jewish works: his commentary on the Mishnah, Mishneh Torah and the Guide for the Perplexed. His multi-faceted careers and interests, as well as his cross-cultural recognition as a Jewish leader, is what makes the Israel Museum’s new exhibition, “A Legacy in Script,” so compelling. The exhibition, presented in partnership with the National Library of Israel and curated by Daisy Raccah-Djivre, Anna Nizza Caplan and Miki Joelson, is an astounding display of manuscripts from diverse geocultural backgrounds that stands as a testament to the depth and duration of Maimonides’ legacy on and off the page.

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