Clinton in China pushes environment, finance

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February 22, 2009 01:11

 
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US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chinese officials agreed Saturday to focus their governments' efforts on stabilizing the battered global economy and combating climate change, putting aside long-standing concerns about human rights. After a morning of talks during her inaugural visit to China as America's top diplomat, Clinton and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi said a regular US-China dialogue on economic issues would be expanded to include troubling security issues. "It is essential that the United States and China have a positive, cooperative relationship," Clinton told reporters at a joint news conference with Yang. She said that they also agreed on the need to develop jointly clean energy technology that would use renewable sources and safely store the dirty emissions from burning coal. With the export-heavy Chinese economy reeling from the US downturn, Clinton sought to reassure China that its massive holdings of US Treasury notes and other government debt would remain a good investment.

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