Court says German mosque must stop broadcasting call to prayer

The local Christian couple had argued that the call to prayers violated their own religious rights.

By REUTERS
February 2, 2018 17:56
1 minute read.
Court says German mosque must stop broadcasting call to prayer

British muslims pray during Friday prayer at the East London mosque.. (photo credit: ODD ANDERSEN / AFP)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

BERLIN - A mosque in northwest Germany may no longer broadcast its Friday midday call to prayer by loudspeaker for now after a local court upheld a challenge by a couple who live nearly 1 km (1,000 yards) away.

The Gelsenkirchen administrative court found that the town of Oer-Erkenschwick had not assessed the local Muslim community's request properly in 2013, but a court spokesman said on Friday that this did not prevent the mosque making a new application.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The local Christian couple had argued that the call to prayers violated their own religious rights.

Anti-Muslim sentiment and support for anti-immigration policies are growing in many parts of Germany after the influx of well over a million migrants from Iraq, Syria and other mostly Muslim countries, beginning in 2015.

Huseyin Turgut, a senior official with the affected mosque, said the court's decision was disappointing.

"The call to prayer lasts for two minutes, just around 1 p.m., but only on Fridays," he said. "We've never had any complaints and we have German neighbors who are much closer - just 10 meters away."

The town's administration could not immediately be reached for comment.


Related Content

August 15, 2018
US defense bill could force Al Jazeera to register as foreign agent

By SETH J. FRANTZMAN