Halal, kosher meat cannot be labeled organic, EU court rules

Halal and kosher meat cannot be marketed as organic because the methods used to produce it are not animal friendly enough, the European Union’s top court ruled.

By CNAAN LIPHSHIZ
March 1, 2019 02:37
1 minute read.
KOSHER INSPECTOR Aaron Wulkan examines meat to ensure that the food is stored and prepared.

KOSHER INSPECTOR Aaron Wulkan examines meat to ensure that the food is stored and prepared according to Jewish regulations and customs in a Bat Yam store.. (photo credit: BAZ RATNER/REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later



Halal and kosher meat cannot be marketed as organic because the methods used to produce it are not animal friendly enough, the European Union’s top court ruled.

Tuesday’s ruling by the EU Court of Justice is primarily a symbolic victory for opponents of the production of halal and kosher meat because those products are very rarely marketed also as being organic.



The ruling was on a lawsuit from 2012 by a French animal welfare association that argued that halal beef shouldn’t be allowed to be sold with the EU logo for organic food, the Associated Press reported.



The court said that halal and kosher meat cannot be considered organic because animals used to produce it are not stunned before they are killed. Stunning significantly reduces animal suffering, the court said.



Jewish and Muslim religious laws require animals be conscious when their necks are cut. Muslim communities are generally more flexible on this point in Europe as the production of halal meat contains fewer restrictions than that of kosher meat.



Opponents of the slaughter without stunning of animals say it is cruel, though advocates of the custom say that, when performed meticulously, it is swift and no less humane than other methods applied in the industrialized slaughter of animals for meat.



Efforts to ban the slaughter of animals without stunning have picked up dramatically in recent years, amid the arrival to Europe of millions of Muslim immigrants and tensions over failures in the integration of the millions who came in recent decades.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

IDF weapons
March 22, 2019
UNHRC votes 23-8 for arms embargo and war crimes suits against Israel

By TOVAH LAZAROFF