Is 'Game of Thrones' opening theme music based off a classic Israeli song?

The cello strings that characterize the soundtrack should not be unfamiliar to the attentive Israeli listener, in fact it nearly has an almost exact identical opening sequence.

By
April 17, 2019 10:25
2 minute read.
Game of Thrones

The Iron Throne is seen on the set of the television series Game of Thrones in the Titanic Quarter of Belfast, Northern Ireland, Picture taken June 24, 2014. (photo credit: PHIL NOBLE/REUTERS)

 
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Game of Thrones fever has once again engulfed the globe after the final season kicked off on Sunday, giving fans one last hurrah before the show will disappear into TV show history as one of the greatest fan-beloved series, joining the ranks of the Sopranos and Breaking Bad.

The premiere episode for the eighth, last and final season of the hit series was released on HBO two days ago, with many fans revering the comeback after the show's almost two-year long hiatus from HBO while creating the final season.

Anyone who has ever been caught in the fangs of GoT's dragons and fantasy fever know very well that the 1-hour experience of bliss, sometimes longer, is incomplete without the dramatic and exciting opening theme song that has the viewer travel through the imaginary topography and world of both Westeros and Essos.

However, leaving aside the Great War to Come, the Starks and Targaryens, even the White Walkers - let's circle back to Israel, specifically Israeli music history from the 70s. 

The cello strings that characterize the soundtrack should not be unfamiliar to the attentive Israeli listener, in fact it nearly has an almost exact identical opening sequence - one hard to mistake to those who love the show.




The GoT theme song bares striking resemblance to a beloved Israeli song by singer Ilanit who in the 70s published the hit called "Song of a Mundane Day." 


To this day, most Israelis will join in with the anthem when they hear the familiar tunes unfold, just as any GoT's fan will join in the humming of the opening theme song, as it is a timeless classic.




No mention of Ilanit is made when one searches for the origin of the "Game of Thrones Main Title Theme." Instead, Ramin Djawadi is credited with composing the entire GoT soundtrack.

Djawadi "started humming what would become the theme tune in the car after seeing the visuals for the title sequence, and conceived the idea for the theme on the drive back to his studio," Wikipedia writes.

Many inspirations are mentioned as having influenced Djawadi, but none refer to the similarity to the Israeli hit.

Judge for yourself. Should Ilanit be credited for having contributed to the GOT Main Theme?

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