Obama asks America to help make tomorrow better

US President's Thanksgiving address asks Americans "to look out for one another and keep our economy moving forward."

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
November 25, 2010 14:37
2 minute read.
US President Barack Obama pardons Apple, a turkey

obama pardons turkey 311. (photo credit: Associated Press)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Saying America has a history of doing what it takes to make a better tomorrow, President Barack Obama is calling on a country climbing out of its worst economic slump in decades to summon that spirit again as it enters its holiday season.

"This is not the hardest Thanksgiving, America has ever faced. But as long as many members of our American family are hurting, we've got to look out for one another," Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address, released for Thursday's Thanksgiving holiday.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


RELATED:
For a Middle East Thanksgiving, turkey and couscous
How do you say turkey in Hebrew?

"As long as many of our sons and daughters and husbands and wives are at war, we've got to support their mission and honor their service," Obama added. "And as long as many of our friends and neighbors are looking for work, we've got to do everything we can to accelerate this recovery and keep our economy moving forward."

In the weekly Republican message, lawmaker-elect Rep. Austin Scott, who represents a district in the state of Georgia, characterized the 85-member incoming freshman class as a "new breed of leaders for a new majority and a new Congress" and said they stand ready to turn around the country.

The Republicans won control of the House of Representatives in elections earlier this month and will take over in January.

"As much as we have to be thankful for, too many Georgians and too many Americans have been out of work for far too long," Scott said. "Our new Republican majority is ready to focus on creating jobs and putting a stop to the runaway spending in Washington, D.C."

Mindful of the new political reality taking shape in Washington, a new order in which Democrats no longer will rule both the White House and Congress, Obama wove another call for bipartisanship into his holiday message.



He said one political party won't be able to solve all the country's problems.

"We've got to do it as one people," the president said. "And in the coming weeks and months, I hope that we can work together, Democrats and Republicans and independents alike, to make progress on these and other issues." He cited jobs and economic recovery among the issues.

Obama is to meet at the White House on Tuesday with congressional leaders from both parties, a session originally announced for Nov. 18 but was delayed a week and a half after Republicans said they couldn't accommodate the president.

Obama was spending Thanksgiving at the White House with family and friends.

Related Content

U.S. President Donald Trump receives a football from Russian President Vladimir Putin
July 20, 2018
Trump invites Putin to Washington despite U.S. uproar over Helsinki summit

By REUTERS