Thailand protest leaders call halt after riots break out

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April 14, 2009 08:50

 
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Leaders of demonstrations that plunged the Thai capital into chaos said Tuesday that they were calling off their protests after combat troops ringed their last stronghold. About 2,000 die-hard protesters began to abandon their encampment around the seat of government following two days of rioting that left two dead and more than 120 injured in clashes between troops and demonstrators across Bangkok. "We have decided to call off the rally today because many brothers and sisters have been hurt and killed. We don't want everybody to suffer the same. And we will not allow more deaths," said key protest leader Jatuporn Phromphan. He said the protesters, who are demanding the resignation of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, "can come back and fight again. Democracy will not end today."

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