Two IAF helicopters make emergency landing in Romania

Shortly after takeoff, light comes on in one of the helicopters signaling a possible electronic malfunction or wiring problem.

By
August 3, 2010 11:21
1 minute read.
A CH-53 YASOUR heavy helicopter like the one shown here crashed in Romania.

IAF helicopter 311. (photo credit: Courtesy)

Eight days after an IAF Sikorsky CH-53 Yasour helicopter crashed in Romania, two Israeli helicopters made emergency landings on Tuesday near Bucharest due to an electronic malfunction.

Romanian Police said they received an emergency call from residents of nearby villages, and sent rescue forces to the area. No casualties were reported.

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The two helicopters were the last of seven that were in Romania last week for training with the Romanian Air Force. Last Monday, however, the training was cut short when a Yasour crashed in the Carpathian Mountains killing six IAF airmen and a Romanian officer.

Four helicopters returned to Israel last Thursday. The two that made an emergency landing on Tuesday had just taken off from the Boboc Air Force Base in central Romania en route to Israel.

Shortly after takeoff, a light went on in one of the helicopters signaling a possible electronic malfunction or wiring problem. As a result, the aircraft landed in a field near Bucharest.

The Romanian Defense Ministry said in a statement that the helicopters requested an emergency landing at approximately 8 a.m. near the village of Vulpesti and that Romanian authorities were in contact with the crews to provide support, resolve the problem, and enable a continuation of the flight.

An IAF C-130 Hercules transport plane left Israel for Romania a shortly after the incident with spare parts that could be needed to repair the aircraft. IDF sources said the helicopters would likely take off again for Israel on Wednesday.


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