UK Election: Cameron close to majority according to exit poll

"The Conservatives have clearly won this election," if the exit poll was correct, Conservative government minister Michael Gove said.

By REUTERS
May 8, 2015 00:46
1 minute read.
David Cameron

British Prime Minister David Cameron.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

LONDON - British Prime Minister David Cameron's Conservatives are on course to win the most seats in parliament but will be just shy of an outright majority, an exit poll showed on Thursday after voting closed in a national election.

The poll put the Conservatives on 316 seats and the main opposition Labor Party on 239. The Scottish National Party (SNP) is set to win 58 seats, all but wiping Labor out in its former Scottish stronghold.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The centrist Liberal Democrats, who have governed in coalition with the Conservatives for the past five years, will get just 10 seats in the 650-seat Westminster parliament, according to the poll released by national broadcasters.

However, the combined total of 326 for the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats indicated that Cameron should be able to stay in office, maybe with the support of another small party.

"The Conservatives have clearly won this election," if the exit poll was correct, Conservative government minister Michael Gove said.

Before the election, opinion polls had shown the two biggest parties neck-and-neck in a vote that could help determine the future of Britain's relationship with the European Union and the place of Scotland within the United Kingdom.

The UK Independence Party, which wants an immediate British withdrawal from the EU, is on track to get two seats, the exit poll showed.



Cameron's Conservatives campaigned on a promise to renegotiate Britain's relationship with the EU before holding a referendum by 2017 on whether to stay in the bloc or leave.

They have pledged to eliminate the budget deficit, now running at 5 percent of gross domestic product, by 2018/19, including through cuts to welfare spending of 12 billion pounds ($18.3 billion).

Miliband's Labor Party has promised to bring down the deficit less aggressively in what it says would be a fairer way. It has said it will aim to eliminate the deficit, excluding investment spending, but has not set out a firm timetable.

Labor has also said it would introduce a "mansion tax" on properties worth over 2 million pounds, and overhaul tax rules for wealthy foreigners.

Related Content

Rashida Tlaib on interview about Arab-Israeli Conflict (August 13, 2018).
August 17, 2018
J Street cancels endorsement from House candidate for 'one state solution'

By MICHAEL WILNER