Violent antisemitic attacks soared 60 percent in Germany in 2018

In previous reports, authorities have indicated that most perpetrators have right-wing extremist backgrounds.

By MARCY OSTER/JTA
February 14, 2019 06:16
1 minute read.
Violent antisemitic attacks soared 60 percent in Germany in 2018

Supporters of the anti-Islam movement PEGIDA (Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West) attend a demonstration in Dresden, Germany, October 21, 2018. (photo credit: DAVID W. CERNY / REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later



(JTA) — Anti-Semitic crimes rose by 10 percent in Germany in 2018, with a 60 percent increase in violent crimes, spurring the main Jewish umbrella group there to call for a “stronger commitment” from police and politicians.

The Central Council of Jews was reacting to a report from the German parliament, the Bundestag, released to the Tagesspiegel newspaper and reported Wednesday.



“The latest numbers are not yet official but they reflect a trend, and that’s alarming,” the council’s president, Josef Schuster, said in a statement. “What Jews had already felt subjectively has been confirmed by the statistics.”



In previous reports, authorities have indicated that most perpetrators have right-wing extremist backgrounds.



Nationwide, there were 1,646 anti-Semitic crimes registered in 2018, up from 1,504 the previous year. Of these, 62 were violent attacks, up from 37 in 2017.



According to the Tagesspiegel, 43 people were injured in antisemitic attacks last year. A total of 857 suspects were identified, but there was only evidence for 19 arrests.



The numbers were delivered, as in past years, to Bundestag Vice President Petra Pau of the Left Party, who has submitted a formal request for national statistics on antisemitic crimes for about two decades. They could change slightly after all 16 German states submit finalized statistics.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Ohio shooting
February 16, 2019
Five killed as gunman opens fire at Illinois warehouse

By REUTERS