Bernie who? Kibbutz has hard time remembering presidential candidate

Kibbutz elder Albert Ely, 79, told Reuters he couldn't put a face to the name but he remembered that "an American called Bernard" had once been a volunteer.

By REUTERS
February 16, 2016 13:09
1 minute read.

Kibbutz elders proud of forgotten volunteer Bernie Sanders

Kibbutz elders proud of forgotten volunteer Bernie Sanders

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

An Israeli kibbutz is taking considerable pride in a former volunteer, US Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders, even though no one on the communal farm can quite remember him.

In 1990 Sanders, then running for Congress, told Israel's Haaretz newspaper he had volunteered for several months as a young man at Kibbutz Shaar Haamakim, a community with deep socialist roots on the edge of the Biblical Jezreel Valley in northern Israel.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Sanders, 74, has mentioned in the past that he once worked on a kibbutz, but its name remained a mystery until Haaretz republished its interview with him earlier this month.

There are no records at Shaar Haamakim of Sanders' stint in 1963 and none of its veteran members can say for sure they ever met him.

That hasn't stopped journalists from streaming into the community to try to dig for details about Sanders' experience at the kibbutz, where the Brooklyn-born Vermont senator, who is Jewish, is now the talk of the farm.

"The fact that Bernie Sanders' name was linked with Kibbutz Shaar Haamakim is a big honour for the kibbutz," said its chairman Yair Merom.

"The values that Bernie Sanders speaks about and his ideology in the presidential race - the modern social democratic values - are incredibly compatible with Kibbutz Shaar Haamakim."



Kibbutz elder Albert Ely, 79, told Reuters he couldn't put a face to the name but he remembered that "an American called Bernard" had once been a volunteer.

"Everybody mentions it. Now that the election campaign began, there is great happiness in the entire kibbutz," said Gilad Hershkikovich, who tends to its cows.

"I'm sure he had a good time here."

Related Content

July 16, 2018
Netanyahu decries security cabinet leaks

By GIL HOFFMAN