Oud Festival Review

These three musicians demonstrated dazzling virtuosity, not for its own sake, but for radiating a spirit of utmost attentiveness and concentration.

By URY EPPSTEIN
December 3, 2016 19:44
Jerusalem’s Oud Festival

Jerusalem’s Oud Festival. (photo credit: PR)

OUD FESTIVAL
Indian Music Jerusalem Theater,
November 22

There is no oud (Middle-Eastern lute) in Indian music. Nevertheless, one owes gratitude to the Oud Festival for presenting a performance of Indian music, although it is recommendable to change its title to a less misleading one.

Sitar player Shuyaat Hussain Khan started his performance with a calm, meditative ambiance. Almost unnoticeably the tempo and volume gradually increased, and before one became aware of it culminated in a tempestuous climax. Tabla (Indian drum) players Amit Choubey and Sapan Anjaria beat asymmetrical rhythmic patterns but despite that played in perfect mutual coordination. After a turbulent climax the music ended with a soft, relaxing conclusion. This is music that has a hypnotic effect, performed with spellbinding virtuosity and split-second mutual attentiveness of the threesome.

To display diversity, Khan added his voice to the sitar in a lyric, introverted-sounding duet of the Indian Sufi tradition. Joined by the tablas, the piece built up to an exciting and finally subsiding conclusion.

These three musicians demonstrated dazzling virtuosity, not for its own sake, but for radiating a spirit of utmost attentiveness and concentration.


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