Quentin Tarantino wins Golden Globe, thanks Israeli wife in Hebrew

Toda, geveret,” Hebrew for “Thanks, Mrs.” Going back into English, he said, “I love you,” before walking off stage.

72nd Cannes Film Festival - After the screening of the film "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" in competition - Red Carpet - Cannes, France, May 21, 2019. Director Quentin Tarantino poses with his wife Daniella Pick (photo credit: REGIS DUVIGNAU/REUTERS)
72nd Cannes Film Festival - After the screening of the film "Once Upon a Time in Hollywood" in competition - Red Carpet - Cannes, France, May 21, 2019. Director Quentin Tarantino poses with his wife Daniella Pick
(photo credit: REGIS DUVIGNAU/REUTERS)
Sometime Tel Aviv resident and husband of Israeli singer/model Daniella Pick, Quentin Tarantino, who won a Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay for the movie, Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood, spoke a little Hebrew as he accepted his award at a ceremony in Los Angeles on Sunday night.
After he thanked his cast, he said, “And my wife who’s watching from Tel Aviv, who’s pregnant with my very first child,” then switched to Hebrew to say, “Toda, geveret,” Hebrew for “Thanks, Mrs.” Going back into English, he said, “I love you,” before walking off stage. Pick posted a photo of Tarantino on her Instagram account and wrote, “Overjoyed and so proud of my husband (also for his Hebrew!) @onceinhollywood”

Quentin Tarantino Wins Best Screenplay for 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' | Golden Globes 2020

Quentin Tarantino Wins Best Screenplay for 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' | Golden Globes 2020 Quentin Tarantino won the Golden Globe for best screenplay for 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.'

Tarantino met Pick, the daughter of Israeli music icon Svika Pick, when he was doing publicity in Israel for his 2009 movie, Inglourious Basterds, about American and French Jews hunting Nazis during World War II. They married in November 2018.


In a July interview with Jimmy Kimmel, on Jimmy Kimmel Live! the director said that he “just got married, I want to have kids.” He also said that he would stop directing after making one more film in order to spend time with his family.
Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood also won Golden Globes for Best Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (although some have questioned whether the film, which has a violent denouement involving the Manson family, belonged in this category), and Best Supporting Actor for Brad Pitt.
1917, an epic drama about World War I, won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture – Drama, and its director, Sam Mendes, who is Jewish, took home the award for Best Director, paying tribute to his World War I veteran grandfather.
“I’d like to dedicate this to my grandfather. He signed up for the First World War. He was age 17. And I hope he’s looking down on us. And I fervently hope it never, ever happens again. Thank you very much,” he said.
Other Jewish winners were Joaquin Phoenix, for his performance in the movie Joker, who gave a profanity-laced speech that tested the response time of the Golden Globes’ censor and thanked the crowd “for putting up with me,” as well as Patricia Arquette, who won the award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television. Arquette made a politically charged speech in which she said, “So while I love my kids so much, I beg of us all to give them a better world.”
Americans of Middle Eastern descent were represented by Ramy Youssef, the Queens-born actor from an Egyptian family who won a Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy. His series, Ramy, a semi-autobiographical look at a Muslim family in New Jersey, runs on the Hulu network.
“Allahu Akbar. I want to thank my God,” he said, after winning the first award of the night.