WATCH: Hebrew 101, lessons for beginners...It may be confusing

The video is being called "Hebrew's Who's On First!"

By
March 23, 2017 16:48
English translations to Hebrew sayings

English translations to Hebrew sayings. (photo credit: ILLUSTRATION)

 
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Just about every English-speaker who has tried to learn Hebrew has stumbled over some of the confusing words beginners need to pick up. "Mi" in Hebrew means who, "he" means she, "hoo" means he and "ma" means what.

Did you get that? Didn't think so.

Neither do Jewish comedian Elon Gold and his daughter, in a new video created in collaboration with StandWithUs.

Gold "plays" an impatient Israeli Hebrew teacher trying to impart the list of new words to Emily, Gold's 7-year-old daughter. By the end he tells her "die" - i.e. enough in Hebrew, but a jarring instruction in English!

The 90-second video pays homage to the famous "Who's On First" sketch first performed by comedians Abbott and Costello in the 1930s.

Last month, Israeli-born actress Natalie Portman offered an insight into Hebrew slang in a video for Vanity Fair.

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