Jerusalem Foundation unveils ‘Social Innovation Challenge’ to mark jubilee

The first prize winner will be eligible for $50,000 in funding, while second and third prize winners will receive $35,000 and $15,000 respectively.

By
July 27, 2016 00:33
1 minute read.
Jerusalem Day

Young people wave Israeli flags during the Jerusalem Day march on June 5. (photo credit: MARC ISRAEL SELLEM)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

“If you are a ‘change-agent’ and have an idea, here is your opportunity to compete for funding and make your dream a reality,” the Jerusalem Foundation announced recently at the launch of its Social Innovation Challenge competition.

The nonprofit foundation – established by legendary mayor Teddy Kollek to promote the development of the city – said prizes totaling half a million shekels will be handed out at the end of its 50th anniversary celebrations to be held in the capital September 20-22, in the presence of President Reuven Rivlin, Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein, Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat, and distinguished guests from Israel and abroad.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


“We are looking for social innovations, a novel solution to a social problem in Jerusalem,” the foundation said. “Your venture can address issues relating to economic development, education [both formal and informal], arts and culture, or dialogue and shared living. Particular attention will be given to vulnerable population groups, such as the elderly, at-risk youth, special needs adults or children, or those residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods.”

“The unique and complex challenges facing Jerusalem have transformed it into a flourishing market of exceptional ideas and initiatives run by Jerusalemites, which are a source of inspiration for the Jerusalem Foundation,” said Jerusalem Foundation President Johanna Arbiv. “Social startups are the building blocks for the construction of modern Jerusalem.”

The challenge is designed to generate ideas for innovative ventures that can respond to Jerusalem’s unique and seemingly insurmountable challenges, according to the foundation.


“We are looking for novel solutions that can solve a particular problem or concern in Jerusalem, but your passion is as important as your project.”

Among the conditions and criteria are that the venture must be in Jerusalem, have a realistically implementable budget, and be submitted by an individual or under the auspices of a legal entity. Deadline for applications is August 5, and preference will be given to ventures that have already secured seed funding.

The first prize winner will be eligible for $50,000 in funding, while second and third prize winners will receive $35,000 and $15,000 respectively.

To apply, fill out the form at https://goo.gl/qea4J8.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

December 13, 2018
Your Investments: Stock market, two steps forward, one step back

By AARON KATSMAN