Masa lifts ban on visiting east Jerusalem, Judea and Samaria

Masa has brought some 120,000 Diaspora Jews, ages 18 to 30, to Israel on various programs in order to strengthen Jewish identity and affinity with Israel.

By
December 20, 2018 16:38
PRIME MINISTER Benjamin Netanyahu poses with participants in the MyMasa Event in Jerusalem last nigh

PRIME MINISTER Benjamin Netanyahu poses with participants in the MyMasa Event in Jerusalem last night.. (photo credit: ELIRAN AVITAL)

 
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The Masa Israel Journey organization has reversed a ban on Masa-funded institutions and participants from visiting the settlements and the entire Judea and Samaria region.

Last week, Masa told institutions with Masa-funded participants that any organized trips to the West Bank and east Jerusalem must be cancelled and that the individuals involved in the Masa programs themselves could not visit those areas privately due to security considerations.

A wave of terror attacks earlier this month in the West Bank prompted the decision.

On Wednesday evening, Masa sent an update to associated institutions stating that the ban was lifted and said that institutions could participate on trips in Judea and Samaria and east Jerusalem, as could individual participants, with approval from the relevant authorities.

Some organizations were upset by the ban on visits to the region, saying that it conveyed a message that Judea and Samaria was less Israeli and less secure than other parts of the country.

Masa has brought some 120,000 Diaspora Jews, ages 18 to 30, to Israel on various programs in order to strengthen Jewish identity and affinity with Israel.

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