Right-wing activist Glick ascends Temple Mount for last time before entering Knesset

The long-time advocate for equal rights for Jews and Muslims on the Temple Mount will not be able to visit the holy site anymore because the prime minister has banned MKs from doing so.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
May 23, 2016 10:31
1 minute read.
Yehuda Glick at Temple Mount.

Yehuda Glick at Temple Mount.. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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Right-wing activist Yehuda Glick ascended the Temple Mount on Monday for the last time before his swearing-in as the newest MK in Likud.

The long-time advocate for equal rights for Jews and Muslims on the Temple Mount will not be able to visit the holy site anymore because the prime minister has banned MKs from doing so.

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Glick was born in the US, and his family moved to Israel when he was eight years old and currently lives in Otniel. He is the father of eight, two of whom he fostered after their parents were killed in a terrorist attack.



Glick, a rabbi, said he is praying to God to guide him and support him as he faces upcoming challenges.

“I don’t have plans to change the world. My main dream is to add a little good to the world, to promote unity among the people of Israel and not let hatred spread,” he said.

“I can’t say that I know exactly what I’ll be involved in, but my hope is that I will be able to bring good and more light to the world and love among people. If only!"



“The State of Israel is one of the greatest miracles in the history of mankind. We should do everything we can to preserve it, and the best way is to listen and cooperate with each other and work together, hand in hand,” Glick asserted.

Lahav Harkov contributed to this report.

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