Swearing in of new mayor of Beit Shemesh 'blotched' by measles

The municipality said that Bloch will be vaccinated on Sunday, and that all journalists and other participants in the ceremony and the press conference should be vaccinated.

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November 22, 2018 13:37
Swearing in of new mayor of Beit Shemesh 'blotched' by measles

NEW MAYOR Aliza Bloch at her victory rally.. (photo credit: FASSY KRAUS DIGITAL)

 
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The Beit Shemesh municipality announced that everyone present at the swearing in of Beit Shemesh’s mayor Aliza Bloch on Tuesday must be vaccinated against measles, due to the revelation that a baby who had contracted the disease was in a nearby room during the ceremony.

The municipality said that Bloch will be vaccinated on Sunday, and that all journalists and other participants in the ceremony and the press conference should be vaccinated.

There have been more than 1,000 cases of measles reported in Israel this year, the bulk of which were in the district of Jerusalem, which includes Beit Shemesh. The Health Ministry said earlier this year that 90% of the cases contracted were either people who had not been vaccinated, or those who came into contact with unvaccinated people.

Measles can have lasting effects such as hearing loss, and is fatal for one in 1,000 children who catch it.


The MMR vaccine is 97% effective in preventing infection from the measles virus when the recommended two doses are received on schedule, according to the Health Ministry.


Lahav Harkov contributed to this report.

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