The Israeli dogs that can detect cancer

Dogs were trained to smell cancer through different samples before, but "Dog Prognose" does it for the first time through saliva.

By ALON EINHORN
February 12, 2019 18:40
1 minute read.
Dog [Illustrative]

Dog [Illustrative]. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Somewhere in Southern Israel, a first-of-its-kind venture trains dogs to locate early signs of cancer.


The name of the laboratory is "Dog Prognose". It allows a person to send a saliva sample (in a small plastic container), and receive an immediate answer as to whether they have cancer. The cost of the test is NIS 399, just a little over $100.
Uri Bakeman, professional dog trainer and owner of the laboratory, told Army Radio that "the most important issue is that this test detects the disease at its earliest stage, since the dogs can identify the characteristic signs of the smell of the disease. If the dog sits down after sniffing the sample, it means it is suspicious."

In a recent study conducted by Prof. Pesach Schwartzman of Ben-Gurion University, it was determined that various types of cancer share an odor that dogs are capable of identifying.

A famous case involved Daisy, a dog who managed to correctly identify 500 cases of cancer, and smell a total of 6,500 samples. Daisy, who worked for "Medical Detection Dogs"- a foundation in the UK - passed away last year.


Daisy was a pioneer in sniffing out cancer cells in breath and urine samples, and even detected her owner's breast cancer in its early stages.




In 2014, Daisy was awarded the centenary edition of the Blue Cross medal for saving hundreds of lives.
 

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

AW119KX
February 15, 2019
Israel purchases seven training helicopters from Italian government

By ZACHARY KEYSER