WJC head: Israel not utilizing capabilities of Russian immigrants

“We need to invest more in education and in setting up challenges, so that all the people who have come here in numbers and can find themselves anywhere in the world, remain in Israel,” he said.

By
December 24, 2017 16:56
1 minute read.
Former Soviet Union immigrants attend a rally

Former Soviet Union immigrants attend a rally. (photo credit: ELIANA APONTE/REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Israel is not doing enough to take full advantage of the capabilities and talents of immigrants from the former Soviet Union, World Jewish Congress CEO Robert Singer said on Friday.

“Israel failed in the 1970s, failed in the 1980s, failed in this in the 1990s, and continues to fail at this even today,” he said in an interview with journalist Elena Lagutina at the Limmud FSU 2017 conference in Eilat this past weekend.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


According to Singer, part of the absorption failure stems from the state not having set sufficient “challenges” that would entice such immigrants to remain in the country.

“We need to invest more in education and in setting up challenges, so that all the people who have come here in numbers and can find themselves anywhere in the world, remain in Israel,” he said.

Singer, who immigrated to Israel from Ukraine in 1972, also called on Russian immigrants to take a more active role in politics.

“One of the mistakes of my generation was that we did not want political influence,” he said. “In retrospect, this immigration brought a lot of talented people... who were busy surviving. I want to say that active participation in civil and political life in Israel is critical.”

He further stressed the importance of education, calling it “the future of the Jewish people.”



Singer, who served in the IDF as a lieutenant colonel, added: “I think that the IDF has outstanding commanders and I think that this is the best education.”

Since 1990, some 3.2 million immigrants have arrived in Israel, the vast majority – some 77% – coming from the former Soviet Union, according to a study published last week by the Central Bureau of Statistics.

Related Content

Sodastream sold to Pepsico for 3.2 billion dollars, Aug 20, 2018
August 20, 2018
SodaStream to stay in Israel after $3.2 billion acquisition

By TAMARA ZIEVE