Israeli start-up is working to develop a flying electric, autonomous car

The Jetsons introduced the idea of the flying car into the minds of American children. Now, an Israeli start-up is working on turning the flying car into reality.

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
June 11, 2019 10:45
The flying car being created by ASKA

The flying car being created by ASKA. (photo credit: ASKA DESIGN TEAM)

 
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The Jetsons introduced the idea of the flying car into the minds of American children. Now, an Israeli start-up is working on turning this flying car into reality.

An article published by the Israeli business site Calcalist reports that Netanya-based NFT Inc. believes autonomous flying cars will solve city road congestion and is working to develop a flying electric, autonomous car. 
The company will present its ideas at the Ecomotion 2019 smart mobility show in Tel Aviv on Tuesday.


Owner Guy Kaplinsky said the vehicle, which he is calling Alaska (Japanese for flying bird) will be equipped with 14 propellers and collapsible wings extracted before takeoff. The car will be around 6.5-feet wide and 39-feet wide with its wings fully extracted. It could hold up to three people and travel as far as 342 miles at up to 149 miles per hour.


And the cost? Between $200,000 and $300,000.


Kaplinsky told Calcalist that NFT, which has a satellite office in California, should be ready to begin testing flights by next year.


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