Uzbekistan signs MOU with Watergen in battle against water shortages

Uzbekistan Minister of Innovation Ibrohim Abdurakhmonov signed the agreement, along with Watergen Vice President of Marketing and Sales Michael Rutman.

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November 2, 2019 16:02
2 minute read.
Uzbekistan signs an MOU with Watergen.

Uzbekistan signs an MOU with Watergen.. (photo credit: WATERGEN)

Uzbekistan's government signed a memorandum of understanding with Israeli-based company Watergen on Tuesday so as to use their unique air-to-water technology to battle water shortages in the country.

The agreement states that thousands of Watergen's GEN-M water generators will be dispatched all around Uzbekistan in areas facing water shortages.

Uzbekistan Minister of Innovation Ibrohim Abdurakhmonov signed the agreement, along with Watergen Vice President of Marketing and Sales Michael Rutman.

"In light of Uzbekistan's water shortage, Uzbekistan desperately needs technology such as that provided by Watergen in order to improve its water sector," said Ukzebsitan Deputy Prime Minister Aziz Abdukhakimov.

Rutman said, "We are giving the people of Uzbekistan a very safe and simple alternative for dealing with a very difficult problem they are facing. Our technology offers the people of Uzbekistan a method to acquire freshwater on a daily basis.

In May, the GEN-M was tested at an orphanage in Bukhara. "Uzbekistan's water utility company was thrilled with our water from air solution and requested to run pilots in several other regions of Uzbekistan, said Watergen President Dr. Michael Mirilashvili.

In September, a Watergen machine was installed in the legendary, 700-year-old palace of the prince of Monaco.

Watergen was created in Rishon Lezion in 2009 and has developed technology that can turn atmospheric water into safe water. GEN-350, the water generator created by the company, can produce up to 900 liters of water per day. It weighs a mere 800 kilograms, making the system transportable and easily installable.

"Our main target is to save and improve people's lives all around the world," Mirilashvili told The Jerusalem Post in March. "We also aim to remove plastic from earth, to reduce the global carbon footprint, and of course make our planet cleaner and safer."

“We created a product that can really be the next source of drinking water,” Pasik told the Post in 2017.

“All these countries that have the water shortages have a humid and hot climate,” Pasik said. “We take all the humidity from the air and extract the water.”

Watergen additionally partnered with the community of Flint, Michigan, in the hopes of helping out with the Flint water crisis, where the city's water was polluted with lead.

The company developed a disaster response vehicle in January for providing fresh water to disaster zones in a partnership with the Red Cross.


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