Behind Kuwait's rising book censorship

Despite a constitution that protects freedom of expression, many Kuwaitis fear that an Islamist bloc in parliament will impose stricter bans

By TERRANCE J. MINTNER/THE MEDIA LINE
October 11, 2018 12:11
THE KUWAITI censors prohibited an encyclopedia depicting Michelangelo’s celebrated nude sculpture of

THE KUWAITI censors prohibited an encyclopedia depicting Michelangelo’s celebrated nude sculpture of ‘David’.... (photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

 
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Kuwaiti activists have held protests in recent days over what they see as a rising government-sponsored tide of book censorship. According to the Kuwait Times, about 80 demonstrators last month converged on Kuwait City’s Irada Square just opposite the country’s parliament building, the National Assembly, to decry the banning of an estimated 4,590 titles.

Activists staged similar protests last month in front of the Ministry of Information, the government body responsible for deciding what books constitute appropriate reading material for the Gulf state’s 4.2 million citizens.

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