Casualties

Entebbe is widely considered one of the most daring, inventive and successful military raids ever conducted. While most of the soldiers and hostages came home, a few did not.

By LAUREN GELFOND FELDINGER
June 29, 2006 09:46
dora bloch 88 298

dora bloch 88 298. (photo credit: )

 
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Entebbe is widely considered one of the most daring, inventive and successful military raids ever conducted. While most of the soldiers and hostages came home, a few did not. * Lt.-Colonel Yoni Netanyahu, Sayeret Matkal Commander and head of the inner ground mission, shot by Ugandan forces. * Hostage Jean-Jacques Maimoni, a teenager shot in the crossfire. * Hostage Ida Borowicz, shot in the crossfire; died in her son's arms. * Hostage Pasco Cohen, shot in the crossfire; died in a hospital in Nairobi, where efforts to save his life failed. * Hostage Dora Bloch, who had been transferred to an Entebbe hospital while being held by the hijackers. When Idi Amin arrived at Entebbe on July 4 and found the hostages gone and the hijackers and many of his own soldiers dead, he ordered Dora Bloch assassinated at the hospital. It was only in May 1979, however, that pathologists identified her remains near a sugar plantation some 50 kilometers east of Kampala.

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