Slow on the draw

Roey Heifetz’s painfully honest drawings exhibit a strong feeling of intimacy with the characters’ inner thoughts and emotions, albeit with a somewhat caricatured bent.

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January 12, 2017 14:28
Roey Heifetz's ‘Victoria’

Roey Heifetz poses at her ‘Victoria’ exhibition in Jerusalem’s Beit Ticho. At right is the large portrait ‘Frau L.’. (photo credit: ELIE POSNER)

 
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Roey Heifetz is clearly not shy about letting it all hang out. As you enter the display space of Beit Ticho in Jerusalem, the delightfully appointed downtown offshoot of the Israel Museum, you can’t miss the outsized offerings in the Berlin-based Israeli artist’s current show there, “Victoria,” which forms part of this year’s Traces VI: The Return of Paper / Reflections on Drawing biennale.

The images are powerful but, more than anything, you are struck – actually, almost bowled over – by the stark, almost painful honesty of the portrayals. Aging women are exhibited in all their wrinkled glory, and there is more than a smidgen of androgyny in there, too. The latter is fueled by thirtysomething Heifetz’s own gender transition.

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