Wine Talk: The politics of wine

Wine has been revered in this land since biblical times, but today there are those who try to tarnish the tannins with BDS.

By
May 25, 2016 18:19
Golan Heights Wienry

A communications post is seen above a Golan Heights Wienry vineyard. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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Throughout our history, wine has played a crucial role. The planting of vineyards and production of wine helped develop the country. Farming villages or settlements often set the political tone; wine was at the forefront at every stage of Israel’s history.

The vineyards planted in the pre-state era are an example. The idea of working the land and making it our own was adopted by the Labor Zionist movement. David Ben-Gurion, Israel’s first prime minister, worked at the Rishon Le Zion Cellars; and Levi Eshkol, Israel’s third prime minister, managed the vineyards, underscoring the importance of the industry in the new Israel. When Theodor Herzl visited Israel in 1898, he was taken to see the Carmel Winery as an active example of the Zionist dream come true. Carmel developed and advanced the new Israeli wine industry through all the challenges of building the state.

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