Film depicting the life of Mohammad set to premier in Iran, Canada

The production, estimated to cost over $40 million dollars, is the first of a trilogy and took more than seven years to complete.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
August 26, 2015 13:44
1 minute read.
Mohammad

Film depicting the life of Mohammad. (photo credit: screenshot)

An Iranian-backed cinematic depiction based on the childhood of the prophet Mohammad set to premier in theaters all across the Islamic Republic Wednesday was postponed due to technical difficulties, AFP reported.

The production, estimated to cost over $40 million dollars, is the first of a trilogy and took more than seven years to complete.

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The 171 minute film stars many of Iran's top actors and was set to open in 140 theaters, one day before premiering in North America at the Montreal Film Festival.
Film depicting the life of Mohammad

Yet, a spokesman for the film said the film's opening was pushed back a day, telling AFP that "it will premiere tomorrow." 

According to Iranian media reports, the film's audio track was incompatible with sound systems in Iranian theaters, forcing a delay to make time for adjustments.

The film's producer and distributor, Mohammad Reza Saberi, told state run ISNA news agency that "those who have purchased tickets in advance can use their tickets from Thursday until next Wednesday."

"Mohammad" is the first of three movies that follow events before the founder of Islam's birth up to his adolescence, before, at 40, the Koran says he became the prophet.

Although Iran condemns characterizations of the prophet's image like those published by French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, Shi'ite Islam takes a more lax view about depictions of religious figures unlike their Sunni counterparts.

While 'Mohammad" has already sold out tickets for many showings in Iran, in the Sunni World the film has sparked a massive controversy.


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