NATO to end Libya military operations by end of the month

"I'm very proud of what we have achieved," NATO chief says while explaining that until end of October NATO will monitor situation and retain capacity to respond to threats to civilians, if needed.

By REUTERS
October 22, 2011 01:42
1 minute read.
Libya flag seen on top of a damaged building

Libya flag 311 (R). (photo credit: REUTERS/Thaier al-Sudani)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

BRUSSELS - NATO's military operations in Libya are very close to completion and the alliance's partners have taken a preliminary decision to end the campaign on Oct. 31, NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said on Friday.

"We agreed that our operations are very close to completion and we have taken a preliminary decision to end Operation Unified Protector on Oct. 31," Rasmussen told a news conference after a meeting of NATO ambassadors in Brussels.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


RELATED:
'Libya offered Israel peace for reduced int'l pressure'
'Egypt intercepts Libyan surface-to-air missiles in Sinai'

Gaddafi releases defiant message from hiding


"(Until Oct. 31) NATO will monitor the situation and retain the capacity to respond to threats to civilians, if needed," he added.

He said the alliance would take a formal decision early next week on ending the operation: "In the meantime, I will consult closely with the United Nations and the National Transitional Council."

"I'm very proud of what we have achieved, together with our partners, including many from the region," Rasmussen said.

Like other Western officials, Rasmussen expressed no regrets in public about the gruesome death of the deposed Libyan dictator, who was captured alive by the forces of the National Transitional Council but was brought dead to a hospital.



"We mounted a complex operation with unprecedented speed and conducted it with the greatest of care," he said.

The NATO operation, officially intended to protect civilians, effectively ended on Thursday with French warplanes blasting Gaddafi's convoy as he and others tried to escape a final stand in Sirte.

Former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, on the run for more than two months, was tracked down and killed in his hometown of Sirte on Thursday.

Asked about the fate of Gaddafi's son Saif al-Islam, he said NATO had no knowledge of his whereabouts.

Related Content

July 19, 2018
Sources close to Netanyahu: Trump knew the Iran nuclear deal was bad

By HERB KEINON, MICHAEL WILNER