Rouhani: Iran won't allow nuclear inspections to jeopardize state secrets

Iranian president becomes latest senior official to express reservations about "intrusive" inspections sought by world powers.

By REUTERS
June 13, 2015 16:47
1 minute read.
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

DUBAI - Iran's President Hassan Rouhani said on Saturday he would not put state secrets at risk in the country's nuclear negotiations, becoming the latest senior official to express reservations about intrusive inspections sought by world powers.

The question of inspectors' access to Iran's nuclear sites and military bases is a major sticking point in the nuclear negotiations between Iran and world powers, which are aiming to strike a deal by June 30.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"Iran will absolutely not allow its national secrets to fall into the hands of foreigners through the Additional Protocol or any other means," Rouhani said in a televised news conference, referring to a mechanism that would allow for more intrusive inspections of Iranian sites.

Rouhani did not rule out implementing such an additional protocol, noting that other countries that are signatories to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty have done so without any problem. But he insisted that Iran should not face especially intrusive measures.

US and French diplomats have called for Iran to accept stringent measures, including access to its military sites and inspections on as little as two hours notice.

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has the final word on Iran's foreign and security policy, has ruled out several requests by the West, including on interviewing its nuclear scientists and "extraordinary supervision measures".

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

A man carries a giant flag made of flags of Iran, Palestine, Syria and Hezbollah, during a ceremony
November 20, 2018
Putin to Israel, U.S.: loosen sanctions in exchange for Iran leaving Syria

By MAARIV ONLINE