Cabinet works to allay Google Street View security fears

Ministers instruct experts to work with Google to find a safe way to implement the feature "as soon as possible."

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
February 21, 2011 17:54
Google Street View car

Google Street View car photographing 311 AP. (photo credit: AP)

 
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The cabinet said it is considering ways to allow Google Street View to photograph Israeli cities, despite concerns the popular service could be used to plot terror attacks.

An official statement said a team of cabinet ministers instructed experts Monday to work with Google to find a safe way to implement the feature "as soon as possible."

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Street View allows users to virtually tour locations on a map. It is already available in 27 countries. Google uses special vehicles with panoramic cameras to take ground-level, 3-D images.

The feature has sparked intense debate about personal privacy in other countries, but in Israel, officials are concerned about putting unprecedented information about potential terrorism targets on the Internet.

Google declined to comment.

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