Logo to differentiate between tested OTCs

Over-the-counter medications that have been shown safe and effective will be recognizable from others on the market, following Health Ministry approval.

By
November 8, 2011 05:52
1 minute read.
OTC logo

OTC logo. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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Over-the-counter medications that have been shown safe and effective will by August 2012 be recognizable from others on the market, following Health Ministry approval Monday of a logo designed for approved OTCs.

In a number of European countries, such as Italy, OTCs have already been required to be specially labeled. This will reduce confusion among customers who do not know the difference between non-prescription drugs that have passed rigid tests and other preparations that have not, according to TELEM, the body in the Israel Chamber of Commerce representing companies that market OTC drugs.

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TELEM said that next summer approved and tested OTCs will be marked “A Non-Prescription Drug for Marketing by a Pharmacist.”

The new Hebrew logo has a turquoise-and-white capsule inside a dark blue circle.

TELEM said that the Health Ministry supervises OTCs from various aspects, such as place of sale, price, advertising messages, presentation and presentation.

However, in recent years, “products such as cosmetics and medical devices, whose use has grown dramatically, have been less rigidly supervised by the ministry.”

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