Most young Israelis would consider private school for kids

Fifty-two percent of those under 35 support a state-run school voucher program in which the education budget would be allocated to parents, who would use it to pay for their children’s school.

By
May 12, 2011 02:41
1 minute read.
Children at the Hadar school

Children at the Hadar school in Negev 311. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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The majority of Israelis under 35 believe the quality of the public education system has deteriorated in recent years and would consider sending their children to private schools, according to a survey released on Wednesday by the Jerusalem Institute for Market Studies.

The researchers polled 1,000 Jewish Israelis.

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Fifty-two percent of those under 35 support a state-run school voucher program in which the education budget would be allocated to parents, who would use it to pay for their children’s school.

While overall, 53% of those polled were opposed to vouchers, among those aged 18-25, 62% support vouchers, and only 29% were against.

Among respondents aged 26- 35, 49% said they support such a system with 41% opposed.

The highest level of opposition to a voucher program came from those over the age of 65, among whom 65% were against this kind of initiative.

According to the institute’s executive director Corinne Sauer, the survey “found no correlation between a family’s income and the probability that parents will consider the private school option. The lower a family’s income, the more likely it is to support school vouchers that would allow parents greater freedom in choosing their children’s school.”



The survey also showed that 53% of those polled feel that the state education system has deteriorated, while only 12% said it has improved and 25% said it has neither declined nor improved.

The highest proportion of respondents who believe the system has deteriorated was found among those aged between 26 and 35, at 61%.

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