Post-storm poll: Government won’t function better in next disaster

The poll found that 52 percent do not think the government will function better, 28% believe it will, and 20% had no opinion.

By GIL STERN STERN HOFFMAN
December 20, 2013 06:44
2 minute read.
A plow collects snow remaining on Jerusalem’s normally bustling Ben-Yehuda Street December 17, 2013

Jerusalem snow plow cleanup 370. (photo credit: Daniel K. Eisenbud)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again



More than half of Israelis do not believe governmental authorities will function any better the next time it faces a serious challenge like last weekend’s massive snowstorm, a Panels poll in The Jerusalem Post’s Hebrew sister paper Sof Hashavua found Thursday.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The poll found that 52 percent do not think the government will function better, 28% believe it will, and 20% had no opinion. The poll found that two-thirds of Israelis believe the government, municipalities, and the Israel Electric Company were not prepared for the storm.

Nevertheless, more Israelis oppose than support forming a parliamentary commission of inquiry to probe the governmental authorities’ handling of the storm, 45% to 42%.

The poll found that were elections held today, Likud Beytenu would win 30 seats, Labor 19, Bayit Yehudi 15, Yesh Atid and Meretz 12, Shas 10, United Torah Judaism 7, Hatnua 5, Hadash 4, and Balad and United Arab List 3.

When asked whether Likud and Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman’s Yisrael Beytenu party should maintain their partnership, 46% said no and 18% said yes. Among Likud Beytenu voters, the results were much different: 54% said they wanted to keep the bond and 36% said to split the parties.

Deputy Interior Minister Faina Kirschenbaum, who is Yisrael Beytenu’s secretary- general, confirmed an Israel Radio report that she said in an internal meeting of the party’s administration that Liberman wanted the two parties to run separately in the next election.



Barring a change of heart by Liberman, his party’s secretariat is expected to meet in January or February to decide to maintain the current bond in the parliament but run separately in the next election.

The same decision will be made at the next Likud convention at the beginning of February, despite the opposition of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu. The prime minister succeeded in blocking a vote on the matter in Wednesday’s convention, but a Likud internal court ruled that the issue will come to a vote at the next convention.

“Likudniks and Yisrael Beytenu activists understand that it was an odd wedding,” said the convention’s chairman, Deputy Defense Minister Danny Danon. “The opinion of Likudniks is clear: We need to cooperate in the Knesset, but next time we are on our own.”

Meanwhile, Likud central committee members approved on Thursday 18 resolutions concerning internal matters in a secret ballot vote at the Tel Aviv fairgrounds.

Related Content

Riot
August 31, 2014
Rioting resumes throughout east Jerusalem Saturday night

By DANIEL K. EISENBUD