July 10: Constitution?

We received no support whatsoever from the various political parties because most of them perceived a constitution as a danger to their narrow interests.

By
July 9, 2015 23:05
3 minute read.
Letters

Letters. (photo credit: REUTERS)

Constitution?

In “Judge Melcer: Without law revision, PM can’t hold on to other ministries” (July 8), Supreme Court Justice Hanan Melcer is reported as having said that the way the government is organized is unconstitutional. Would it were so! It would mean we had a constitution, at last.

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Having worked long and hard with many others under the leadership of law professor Uriel Reichman in the Constitution for Israel movement, we had to admit defeat. We received no support whatsoever from the various political parties because most of them perceived a constitution as a danger to their narrow interests.

Perhaps Justice Melcer could offer his opinion on this.

JERRY AVIRAM
Tel Aviv

Letters on letters

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 Reader James Adler asks why anyone should doubt US President Barack Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry when they say they won’t “shave” their demands on Iran (“Iran talks,” Letters, July 8).

The list of reasons is too long for this letter. But Adler asks for an alternative to talks, other than war.

An obvious alternative is to walk away from the talks now and increase the sanctions. This can give the peace-loving Iranians more fuel for overthrowing the mullahs.



AVIGDOR BONCHEK

J
erusalem Reader Ben Klein (“Measuring up,” Letters, July 7) writes: “The behavior by the EU members of the Human Rights Council reminds me of Psalms 83, regarding all the nations conspiring against Israel.”

The custom in Germany was to say this psalm every morning after the psalm of the day. It was of great antiquity, being mentioned in the 11th-century Mahzor Vitry. Interestingly, this long predated the daily psalm at the end of the morning Shaharit service, which, according to the 17th-century Kitzur Shelah, was only said by pious individuals.

Unfortunately, the custom was not more widely accepted and fell into desuetude. Perhaps in view of the current situation, we should consider reintroducing it in all communities on a regular basis.

MARTIN D. STERN
Salford, UK

Recognizing J’lem

Concerning “Top Democratic presidential contender calls for strategy to fight BDS movement” (July 7), if Hillary Clinton wants to give a clear message of support for Israel, let her state that she would definitely move the US Embassy to Jerusalem immediately after her inauguration.

It is a slap in the face that the US does not have its embassy in the capital of Israel, which loves the United States possibly more than any other country.

Meanwhile, the US is setting up an embassy in the capital of Cuba, a country that has vilified it for many years. It also has an embassy in Hanoi, capital of a nation it was at war with. It has embassies in the recognized capitals of the Middle East. Except for that of Israel.

SHELDON LINDEN
New York

It was worthwhile

“Lands of our fathers” (Observations, July 3) reminded me of a pleasant encounter with the late Harry Secombe, the Welsh comedian and singer. He had come to Israel to film a religious TV series, and part of his itinerary was to plant a tree.

I had the pleasure to be his guide. After reciting the Planter’s Prayer in English and planting the tree, he asked if there was anything else he could do. I replied that the Welsh anthem was “Land of our Fathers” and added that after a 2,000- year exile, I could now live in the land of my own fathers. So I asked him to sing it for me.

When Secombe opened in his lovely, rich tenor, it was worthwhile to see the faces of the foresters. It is a wonderful memory of a very humane person.

EMANUEL FISCHER
Jerusalem


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