United for a safer world

Why are they so dedicated? Many of our volunteers have personal stories that motivate them.

By ELI BEER
January 17, 2013 22:09
2 minute read.
United Hatzalah president Eli Beer

United Hatzalah president Eli Beer_390. (photo credit: Untied Hatzalah)

 
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Last week, while Modi’in Illit was cut off from the world by floods caused by an unusually strong storm system, a resident of the town went into labor.

Her husband called an ambulance to help them get to a nearby hospital amid the torrential rain and the strong gusts of wind, but because of the storm, the roads were blocked and the ambulance could not enter the town or get close to the mother-to-be.

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In almost any other country this would have meant that a pregnant woman and her husband would have faced the already taxing process of childbirth without trained medical personnel in attendance. Luckily enough, they live in Israel.

In Israel we are lucky to have an organization – or rather, a network – called United Hatzalah. Two thousand volunteers all around the country are there for you – possibly living or working in a neighboring street or even building – when you are in need of medical attention – trained medics, paramedics and doctors.

United Hatzalah has volunteers from all sectors of Israeli society. From Kiryat Sefer to Kiryat Shmona, from Kfar Chabad to Kafr Kasim and from Eilat to Ramat Hagolan. In religious neighborhoods and secular kibbutzim and everywhere in between, Jewish, Muslim and Christian volunteers all work together for a shared, greater good: the saving of lives.

Why are they so dedicated? Many of our volunteers have personal stories that motivate them. Some have needlessly lost family members in medical incidents where they could have been saved had there been a first responder on scene during those critical minutes before an ambulance arrives. Some knew Hatzalah’s work from before and wanted to “join the force.”

I personally am still under the effect of the bus bombing I witnessed as a five-year-old on the way home from school. Since that moment I just wanted to help – and wanted to gather those around me who had the same goal. I wanted to be there for those who are in need of medical attention, a pair of helping hands. To save lives.



In the case of the young woman in Modi’in Illit, the father dialed 1-221 (United Hatzalah’s emergency number). Two volunteers arrived to the couple’s home within minutes.

When they realized that the birth was progressing faster than expected, they stopped focusing on preparing her for transportation and instead got the couple’s living room ready for the birth. While the ambulance was waiting just outside of the town, the volunteers calmed the parents-to-be down.

Thanks to their prompt and proper medical attention a healthy, plump baby girl was born into a very rainy, but safe world.

The writer is founder and president of United Hatzalah.

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