Arava farmers may lose their fields in Jordan

By DENNIS ZINN
October 25, 2018 17:16

Arava farmers may lose their fields in Jordan, October 25, 2018 (Dennis Zinn)

Arava farmers may lose their fields in Jordan, October 25, 2018 (Dennis Zinn)

 
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The Arava Desert is situated south of the Dead Sea basin and spans across Israel and Jordan. Since a 1994 treaty between the two countries, Israeli farmers have crossed the border to cultivate land, but Jordan's decision on Sunday to opt out of the treaty's annexes could mean the loss of farming land for Israeli farmers.

The Jerusalem Post spoke with some of the people who tend the land every day and asked them to describe the situation and how it could affect their livelihood.

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