Greta Thunberg named Time Magazine's Person of the Year

“We can’t just continue living as if there was no tomorrow, because there is a tomorrow,” Thunberg told Time Magazine. “That is all we are saying.”

Time cover features Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg named the magazine's Person of the Year for 2019 (photo credit: REUTERS)
Time cover features Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg named the magazine's Person of the Year for 2019
(photo credit: REUTERS)
Time magazine has named Greta Thunberg their Person of the Year. 
Over the last 16 months Thunberg has made waves with her climate activism, meeting with the Pope, locking horns with President Donald Trump, addressing heads of state at the UN, and inspiring 4 million people to join the global climate strike on September 20, 2019 - the largest climate demonstration to date. 
“We can’t just continue living as if there was no tomorrow, because there is a tomorrow,” Thunberg told Time Magazine. “That is all we are saying.”
Thunberg began her mission in August 2018, when she skipped school and camped out in front of the Swedish Parliament, holding a sign that read Skolstrejk för klimatet: “School Strike for Climate.”
She has caught the eye of the world's most powerful leaders. Trump shared her speech from the UN summit, where she accused the leaders of climate negligence, by claiming "She seems like a very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future."
Thunberg's way of dealing with such critique is by changing her Twitter profile to exactly what she has been called, so she changed it to read "A very happy young girl looking forward to a bright and wonderful future."
On Tuesday, Brazil's right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro called her a "brat" (using the Portuguese word "pirralha") after she criticized mounting violence against indigenous people in which two Amazon tribesmen were shot dead four days ago.
The teen activist once again retorted by changing the biographical description on her Twitter account to "Pirralha."
Thunberg's effect had reached Israel, when Israelis who are concerned about a warming climate are placing pictures of Thunberg in their kitchen areas in workplaces across Tel Aviv, next to disposable forks, knives and plates, to shame their colleagues for using plastic ware.