Against coronavirus regulations, schools open, weddings held

Some citizens expressed frustration and distrust in the curfew system, saying that "no one checked who was entering or exiting the neighborhood."

A general view shows a street in Bnei Brak as Israel enforces a lockdown, April 3, 2020 (photo credit: AMMAR AWAD/REUTERS)
A general view shows a street in Bnei Brak as Israel enforces a lockdown, April 3, 2020
(photo credit: AMMAR AWAD/REUTERS)
Israeli Police broke up seven weddings on the first night of the curfew imposed on red cities. Police set up barricades in an attempt to keep citizens from traveling farther than 500 meters from their homes.
Police also broke up 2 gatherings of approximately 200 people in Jerusalem's City Center and gave tickets to the organizers, according to Walla.
Some schools in red neighborhoods in Ashkelon opened against regulations and reported that they were not told to close, according to Kan.
Approximately 3,000 police officers will be enforcing the curfew, supported by 500 IDF soldiers. The government has authorized an additional 500 soldiers to enforce curfew if necessary.
Some citizens expressed frustration and distrust in the curfew system, telling N12 that “no one checked who was entering or exiting the neighborhood. They just blocked off some lanes. Instead of a nightly curfew, it is a nightly planned traffic jam.”
Some residents reported not knowing that there was a curfew, according to Walla. Others said that they only heard about the curfew indirectly from the news.
A resident of Bnei Brak expressed doubts that the curfew will have an impact, saying that “it is all politics,” according to N12.
Some were happy to see police enforcing the curfew and expressed hope that it will have an impact on the spread of coronavirus, according to the station. A resident of Shfaram said that he is “in favor of curfews,” and that authorities should “close down more.”